Inspiration for building visual character  in comic art is all around us. Cartooning's great gift is that its merits rest on the hand and the head of the cartoonist, coming together in something we call gesture. Your gesture is unique to your hand and your head. And my gesture is unique to my hand and my head. If you have that, then you can make cartoons, and you now have free license to "copy." This series of comic characters came out of a morning spent at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. By locating fine art objects (sometimes just pieces of fine art objects) and sketching or "copying" them under a strict, 3-minute time limit, the characters surface. They're barely an impression of the fine art they represent—terrible by fine art standards—but with a little inking and care, and gesture, they become cartoons. Try it, it's fun!
       
     
Museum002.jpg
       
     
Museum003.jpg
       
     
Museum004.jpg
       
     
Museum005.jpg
       
     
Museum006.jpg
       
     
Museum007.jpg
       
     
Museum008.jpg
       
     
Museum009.jpg
       
     
Museum010.jpg
       
     
Museum011.jpg
       
     
Museum012.jpg
       
     
Museum013.jpg
       
     
Museum014.jpg
       
     
Museum015.jpg
       
     
Museum016.jpg
       
     
Museum017.jpg
       
     
Museum019.jpg
       
     
Museum020.jpg
       
     
Museum018.jpg
       
     
  Inspiration for building visual character  in comic art is all around us. Cartooning's great gift is that its merits rest on the hand and the head of the cartoonist, coming together in something we call gesture. Your gesture is unique to your hand and your head. And my gesture is unique to my hand and my head. If you have that, then you can make cartoons, and you now have free license to "copy." This series of comic characters came out of a morning spent at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. By locating fine art objects (sometimes just pieces of fine art objects) and sketching or "copying" them under a strict, 3-minute time limit, the characters surface. They're barely an impression of the fine art they represent—terrible by fine art standards—but with a little inking and care, and gesture, they become cartoons. Try it, it's fun!
       
     

Inspiration for building visual character in comic art is all around us. Cartooning's great gift is that its merits rest on the hand and the head of the cartoonist, coming together in something we call gesture. Your gesture is unique to your hand and your head. And my gesture is unique to my hand and my head. If you have that, then you can make cartoons, and you now have free license to "copy." This series of comic characters came out of a morning spent at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. By locating fine art objects (sometimes just pieces of fine art objects) and sketching or "copying" them under a strict, 3-minute time limit, the characters surface. They're barely an impression of the fine art they represent—terrible by fine art standards—but with a little inking and care, and gesture, they become cartoons. Try it, it's fun!

Museum002.jpg
       
     
Museum003.jpg
       
     
Museum004.jpg
       
     
Museum005.jpg
       
     
Museum006.jpg
       
     
Museum007.jpg
       
     
Museum008.jpg
       
     
Museum009.jpg
       
     
Museum010.jpg
       
     
Museum011.jpg
       
     
Museum012.jpg
       
     
Museum013.jpg
       
     
Museum014.jpg
       
     
Museum015.jpg
       
     
Museum016.jpg
       
     
Museum017.jpg
       
     
Museum019.jpg
       
     
Museum020.jpg
       
     
Museum018.jpg